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Legal Costs in Wrongful Dismissal Cases: Beware of Losing the Forest for the Trees

By , July 18, 2014 2:42 pm

Damages for Most Wrongfully Dismissed Employees are usually less than $ 50 000 Most terminated employees cannot prove more than $ 50 000 damages in a wrongful dismissal action. Why? Because a court will deduct any income the person earns during the notice period from the wrongful dismissal damages owing. For more information on wrongful Continue Reading…

Employee Payroll Costs in Ontario: Nowhere to Go but Up

By , July 17, 2014 12:03 pm

The Minimum Wage is Increasing On June 1, 2014 the minimum wage increased to $ 11 per hour for most employees. A momentous increase for employers? Perhaps not. But let’s take a look at the bigger financial picture; the cost of employing a person in Ontario is more than the person’s salary or wages. A Continue Reading…

Wrongful Dismissal Law: Summary Judgment Motions – The Way of the Future

By , July 3, 2014 2:42 pm

Since the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision earlier this year in Hryniak v. Mauldin 2014 SCC 7 (CanLII) more and more employees are bringing summary judgment motions to resolve their wrongful dismissal cases. Wrongful Dismissal Cases that are Suitable for Summary Judgment Motions This kind of motion is usually brought if an employer terminates an employee without Continue Reading…

Wrongful Dismissal: The Cost of Terminating a Senior Citizen

By , June 20, 2014 1:17 pm

In 2008, mandatory retirement was eliminated in Ontario. Since then the courts are starting to see more wrongful dismissal cases involving senior citizens. Many employers are concerned that judges will start finding very lengthy reasonable notice periods for older workers. The unofficial maximum reasonable notice period is generally considered to be 24 months. 70 year Continue Reading…

Employee Denied Termination Pay Because He Violated His Employer’s Attendance Policy

By , June 2, 2014 3:38 pm

Employee Denied Termination Pay Because He Violated His Employer’s Attendance Policy An employer can avoid paying an employee termination pay under Ontario’s Employment  Standards Act (ESA) if the employee engages in willful neglect of duty, willful misconduct and/or willful disobedience that is not trivial and is not condoned by an employer. For more information on Continue Reading…

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