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Posts tagged: employment contract

The Cost of Terminating Employees When a Business is Sold

By , April 17, 2018 8:29 am

When a business is sold the cost of terminating unwanted employees can significantly impact the sale price. The purchaser does not want to pay the cost of terminating long service employees, and the seller doesn’t want to incur termination costs which reduces the net sale price.

General Rules on Termination Pay Obligation when a Business is Sold

  1. Under the Employment Standards Act (the “ESA”)

A section in the ESA states that when a business is sold an employee’s service with the seller is deemed to be service with the buyer when the buyer subsequently terminates the employee. So if an employee worked five years with the seller and is terminated six months later by the buyer then the buyer owes the employee five weeks notice of termination; not one week notice.

  1. At Common law

Unless the buyer stipulates otherwise, an employee’s service with the seller is taken into account by the courts when determining common law reasonable notice of termination when the buyer subsequently terminates the employee.

How the Seller of a Business Can Reduce Termination Costs

If you are thinking of selling your business over the next 2 to 3 years then a great way to reduce termination costs is to make sure that all of your employees have signed an employment contract with an enforceable termination clause. This clause can significantly reduce your termination pay obligations for employees you are required to terminate as a condition of the sale.

Existing employees can sign an employment contract but managing this process can be very tricky. We help sellers navigate this legal and HR minefield.

How a Purchaser of a Business Can Reduce Termination Costs

If you are buying a business then a great way to limit liability for termination pay for the employees you inherit from the seller is to require them to sign an employment contract with an enforceable termination clause.

We help buyers prepare employment contracts for the seller’s employees that address employee benefits, vacation, termination pay and other terms of employment that are of interest to the seller’s employees. This is especially important for key employees who are critical to the continued success of the business.

Lessons to Be Learned:

1. The cost of terminating long-term employees can be significant. In fact, in some cases I have seen termination costs eat up most of the sale proceeds.

2. To avoid this situation, termination costs can be reduced by including a termination clause in an employment contract. These contracts can significantly benefit the seller.

3. Often one of the key challenges for the seller is convincing the buyer to take on all employees on substantially the same terms and conditions of employment. We help our clients with this issue.

4. On the other hand, one of the key success factors in a sale of a business for the buyer is retaining certain key employees. Negotiating a “fair” employment contract with these employees can be difficult because these employees have so much bargaining power. We help our clients with this negotiation.

5. Sellers and buyers can benefit from speaking with an employment lawyer well in advance of the sale of a business.

For over 30 years Doug MacLeod has been advising employers on all aspects of the employment relationship. You can contact Doug directly at 416 317-9894 or at [email protected]

The material and information in this blog and this website are for general information only. They should not be relied on as legal advice or opinion. The authors make no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of any information referred to in this blog or its links. No person should act or refrain from acting in reliance on any information found on this website or blog. Readers should obtain appropriate professional advice from a lawyer duly licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. These materials do not create a lawyer-client relationship between you and any of the authors or the MacLeod Law Firm.

 

Case Study: Why You Need to Periodically Review Your Employment Contract

By , October 11, 2017 9:08 am

A well-drafted employment contract is the best employment law investment an employer can make. It protects an employer from significant liability and will usually save thousands of dollars in termination costs.

An employment contract should be reviewed periodically because judges are refusing to enforce termination clauses if they are not drafted properly.

In a recent case, Covenoho v. Pendylum Ltd.,2017 ONCA 284, Ontario’s highest court concluded a termination clause was not legally enforceable because it might breach the Employment Standards Act (“ESA”) in the future.

The Facts

Joss Covenoho signed a one year fixed-term contract with Pendylum Inc. The employer terminated her agreement without advance notice when she had been employed for less that 3 months. The termination clause stated in part that the contract could be terminated before the end of the fixed-term “if the Pendylum Client to which you have been contracted terminate[s] its contract with Pendylum for your services”.

Decision by Motion Judge

The motion judge concluded that since the employee had been employed for less than three months, she was not entitled to any notice of termination. Under the ESA an employer is not required to provide any notice of employment to an employee during the first three months of employment.

Decision by Court of Appeal

The Court of Appeal reversed the motion judge’s decision and found that the termination provisions were void. It ruled that “the terms must be construed as if (the employee) had continued to be employed beyond three months; if a provision’s application potentially violates the ESA at any date after hiring, it is void”. In this case, if Ms. Covenoho had been terminated after three months of work, then the termination clause would have violated the ESA because she could have been terminated without any notice of termination (or any payment in lieu of notice) contrary to the ESA.  The court also ruled the employee was entitled to receive the salary that she would have earned for the balance of the fixed-term contract.

Lessons for employers:

1)   Employers should periodically review their termination clauses to ensure they are properly drafted and do not provide shorter notice than required by the ESA.

2)  As we have written about before, it is generally a bad idea to enter into a fixed term contract. If a fixed term contract must be used, it must include an enforceable early termination clause.

On October 16 and October 20 MacLeod Law Firm is holding seminars in Toronto and Barrie that will cover three topics. One topic is why employment contracts need to be reviewed periodically. Cases like this one is one reason but there are other reasons. Information on the seminar can be found here.

For over 25 years, Doug MacLeod of the MacLeod Law Firm has been advising employers on all aspects of the employment relationship. If you have any questions, you can contact him directly at 416 317-9894 or at [email protected]

The material and information in this blog and this website are for general information only. They should not be relied on as legal advice or opinion. The authors make no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of any information referred to in this blog or its links. No person should act or refrain from acting in reliance on any information found on this website or blog. Readers should obtain appropriate professional advice from a lawyer duly licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. These materials do not create a lawyer-client relationship between you and any of the authors or the MacLeod Law Firm.

 

Negligent misrepresentation during recruitment process costs employer $83,000

By , October 10, 2017 4:53 pm

Providing misleading information to an employee during the recruitment process about the eligibility for an employee benefits program cost an employer $83,000

Feldstein v 364 Northern Development Corporation

Mr. Feldstein applied for a software engineer position with 364 Northern Development Corporation (“the Company”). Before accepting the position, Mr. Feldstein asked the Company’s Chief Information Officer (“CIO”) about the eligibility requirements for the Company’s long-term disability (“LTD”) plan. As Mr. Feldstein suffered from cystic fibrosis, this information was very important to him, as he believed that he would require substantial LTD benefits in the future.

The CIO provided Mr. Feldstein with a brochure which summarised the Company’s LTD benefits, which contained a “proof of good health” clause. When Mr. Feldstein asked what this clause meant, the CIO explained that he would qualify for LTD benefits after working for the Company for three months. Based on this information, Mr. Feldstein accepted the position and signed an employment contract.

The employment contract in question contained the following “entire agreement” clause:

“This Agreement constitutes the entire agreement between the parties and supersedes all prior communications, representations, understandings and agreements whether verbal or written between the parties with respect to the subject-matter hereof.”

The purpose of an entire agreement clause is to prevent parties who have entered into a final contract from invoking prior discussions or understandings to give a different meaning to its provisions.

However, the contract did not contain any details of the benefits plan. Instead, the clause in the contract stated:

“The Employee shall be entitled to participate in all rights and benefits under any life insurance, disability, medical, dental, health and accident plans maintained by the company for its employees generally. In addition, the Employee shall be entitled to participate in all rights and benefits under other employee plan or plans as may be implemented by the Company during the term of this Agreement.

Shortly after accepting the position, Mr. Feldstein applied for LTD benefits as his health deteriorated significantly. He expected to receive full coverage of up to $5000 per month. Instead, Mr. Feldstein was only eligible for $1000 per month because he had not completed a medical questionnaire which was required to establish “proof of good health.” Mr. feldstein sued the Company for negligent misrepresentation.

Decision

The trial judge made the following findings:

  • the CIO’s explanation of “proof of good health” was inaccurate and misleading;
  • the Company was negligent in making this representation as the CIO had not taken any steps to verify the accuracy of the information he provided and the Company failed to provide Mr. Feldstein with the required medical questionnaire
  • it was reasonable for Mr. Feldstein to rely on the information the CIO provided; and
  • Mr. Feldstein would not have accepted an employment offer that did not provide adequate LTD coverage and acceptable eligibility requirements due to his health concerns.

The Company attempted to argue that the entire agreement clause in the employment contract meant that Mr. Feldstein could not sue for negligent misrepresentation. The court rejected this argument, as the CIO’s statement relating to the meaning of “proof of good health” was not an express term of the contract. As it was a matter outside of the contract, the clause could not exclude liability for pre-contractual misrepresentation.

Mr. Feldstein was awarded $83,336.80 as compensation for lost LTD benefits and $10,000 for aggravated damages. On appeal, the award for loss of benefits was upheld, but the aggravated damages were overturned.

Lessons to be learned

  1. Anyone interviewing a job applicant should provide accurate information concerning employee benefits; otherwise, the organisation may be required to self-insure for the value of benefits that are subsequently denied by the group insurer.
  2. Including an entire agreement clause in a contract like the one cited above does not always protect an employer from negligent misrepresentations made during the hiring process.
  3. It is important to periodically review employment contracts including entire agreement clauses and clauses dealing with group benefits to ensure they still protect employer interests in light of recent developments in the law.

The material and information in this blog and this website are for general information only. They should not be relied on as legal advice or opinion. The authors make no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of any information referred to in this blog or its links. No person should act or refrain from acting in reliance on any information found on this website or blog. Readers should obtain appropriate professional advice from a lawyer duly licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. These materials do not create a lawyer-client relationship between you and any of the authors or the MacLeod Law Firm.

Everything You Need to Know About Ontario’s Employment Laws

By , September 26, 2017 9:35 am

Now that I have your attention, let me outline three things you need to know.

  1. The Ministry of Labour is devoting considerably more resources to enforcing the Employment Standards Act (the “ESA”) and your organization is more likely to be inspected.

Earlier this year, the government announced it was hiring an additional 175 enforcement officers. In addition, I expect amendments to the ESA will be passed this fall by way of Bill 148 which will impose several new obligations on employers.

If your organization is inspected you will be asked, among other things, if you have: posted certain required written policies; provided employees with required training & documentation; posted certain required information in a conspicuous place; and, complied with the new obligations imposed by Bill 148. If not, then the inspector will issue orders and you must comply with these orders. If not, your organization will be subject to significant fines.

Are you ready for an inspection?

  1. About 50% of the complaints that are filed with the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal deal with disability related discrimination. In many cases, an employee claims the employer has failed to accommodate a disability. So chances are you will receive a request for accommodation at some point in time.

Responding to a request for accommodation can be extremely complicated. Failing to do so can be extremely costly.

Did you know that there is a procedural duty to accommodate and a substantive duty to accommodate?

Did you know that in some cases you have a duty to ask an employee if they have a disability?

Did you know that in some cases you have a duty to offer another position to a disabled employee?

Do you know whether or not you can require an employee seeking accommodation to see a doctor of your choosing?

Did you know that some employers are required to prepare a written individual accommodation plan for a disabled employee?

Do you feel comfortable responding to a request for accommodation?

  1. A well drafted employment contract is, in my opinion, the best employment law investment you will ever make. For various reasons it needs to be reviewed periodically.

In an era when the government is taking away management rights, did you know that an employment contract can add to your management rights?

In an era when courts are refusing to enforce termination clauses (and other clauses)  in employment contracts, did you know that you need to periodically review your contract to make sure it doesn’t need to be amended?

When the government imposes new obligations on employers such as the ones that are contained in Bill 148, did you know that you need to review your employment contract to make sure it complies with the ESA? For example, if your contract states that an employee receives two weeks vacation each year then this clause will need to be changed if one section in Bill 148 becomes law this fall.

The MacLeod Law Firm is not in the seminar business. I believe these topics are so important, however, that I am holding a seminar in Toronto on October 16th and in Barrie On October 20th to discuss them.

For more information about the seminar, click here.

For over 25 years, Doug MacLeod of the MacLeod Law Firm has been advising employers on all aspects of the employment relationship. If you have any questions, you can contact him directly at 416 317-9894 or at [email protected]

The material and information in this blog and this website are for general information only. They should not be relied on as legal advice or opinion. The authors make no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of any information referred to in this blog or its links. No person should act or refrain from acting in reliance on any information found on this website or blog. Readers should obtain appropriate professional advice from a lawyer duly licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. These materials do not create a lawyer-client relationship between you and any of the authors or the MacLeod Law Firm.

 

Probationary Clause Gets Employer Into Hot Water

By , February 14, 2017 8:57 am

Including a probationary period clause in an employment contract is not a good idea unless your organization is prepared to assess the suitability of the employee during the probationary period.

Failure to do so can result in your organization being ordered to provide a probationary employee with common law reasonable notice of termination.

This blog discusses one such case.

Probationary Employee Awarded Three Months Termination Pay

The Contractual Language

In Ly v. British Columbia (Interior Health Authority), 2017 BCSC 42, an employee signed back an offer of employment which included the following sentence: “Employees are required to serve an initial probationary period of six (6) months for new positions.”

The contract was silent on the employee’s rights and the employer’s obligations with respect to terminating the employee’s employment during the probationary period.

What does the term Probation Mean?

The judge in this case stated: “The term “probation” is well understood in business and industry as one where an employee is being assessed by the employer to ascertain the suitability of the employee as a permanent employee: …”

What does Assessing Suitability Require?

The judge stated: “An employer needs only to establish that it acted in good faith in its assessment of the probationary employee’s suitability: …

In determining whether an employer acted in good faith, courts have examined the process through which the employer determines whether the employee is suitable for permanent employment.  While an employer is not required to give reasons for the dismissal of a probationary employee, that employer’s conduct in assessing the employee is reviewed by the court in light of various factors such as:

1) whether the probationary employee was made aware of the basis for the employer’s assessment of suitability before, or at the commencement of, employment;

2) whether the employer acted fairly and with reasonable diligence in assessing suitability;

 3) whether the employee was given a reasonable opportunity to demonstrate his suitability for the position; and

4) whether the employer’s decision was based on an honest, fair and reasonable assessment of the suitability of the employee, including not only job skills and performance but also character, judgment, compatibility, and reliability: …

 

How Much Notice of Termination Was the Probationary Employee Entitled to Receive?

Because the judge found that the employer had not made a good faith assessment of the employee’s suitability the judge concluded the employee was entitled to reasonable notice of termination using the Bardal factors: Having considered the length of Mr. Ly’s employment, including the probationary term of his employment, along with his age, the character of his employment, the availability of his employment, and his experience, training and qualifications, I am of the view that a three-month notice period is reasonable in this case.”

Lessons to Be Learned

  1. Think long and hard about whether you need a probationary clause in an employment contract.
  2. If the reason for this clause is to terminate a probationary employee with as little notice of termination as legally required then this objective can be accomplished with a properly worded termination clause.
  3. If you want to include a probationary period in an employment contract then make sure your organization makes a good faith effort to assess the employee’s suitability. This requires management time including answering suitability questions from the probationary employee.

For over 25 years, Doug MacLeod of the MacLeod Law Firm has been advising employers on all aspects of the employment relationship. If you have any questions, you can contact him at 416 317-9894 or at [email protected]

“The material and information provided on this blog and this website are for general information only and should not, in any respect, be relied on as legal advice or opinion. The authors make no claims, promises or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of any information linked or referred to or contained herein. No person should act or refrain from acting in reliance on any information found on this website or blog, without first retaining counsel and obtaining appropriate professional advice from a lawyer duly licensed to practice law in the relevant jurisdiction. These materials do not constitute legal advice and do not create a lawyer-client relationship between you and any of the authors or the MacLeod Law Firm.”

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